Gramazio Kohler Research
News
About
Team
Teaching
Research
Publications
Open Positions
Contact
Seminar Week
MAS Architecture and Digital Fabrication
AAG 2016 Workshop
Spatial Extrusions 2
Spatial Extrusions
Graded Structures 2
Graded Structures
Robotic Wire Cutting Summerschool
Spatial Wire Cutting
Extruded Structures
Remote Material Deposition Installation
Remote Material Deposition
Depth Modulations 2
Design of Robotic Fabricated High Rises 2
Depth Modulations
Complex Timber Structures 2
Complex Timber Structures 1
Robotic Metal Aggregations
Shifted Frames 2
Design of Robotic Fabricated High Rises 1
Shifted Frames 1
Spatial Aggregations 2
Spatial Aggregations 1
Robotic Clay Molding
The Fragile Structure 2
The Fragile Structure 1
Procedural Landscapes 2
Procedural Landscapes 1
Curved Folding
The Interlocking 2
The Interlocking 1
The Sequential Structure 2
The Sequential Structure 1
Explicit Bricks
The Programmed Column 2
The Programmed Column 1
Open Air Theater
Voxels 2
Voxels 1
The Stacked Pavilion
The Opening 2
The Opening 1
The Sequential Wall 2
The Sequential Wall 1
Acoustics
The Foam
The Resolution Wall
Construction Hoarding
The Dissolved Wall
Domoterra Lounge
The Perforated Wall 2
The Perforated Wall 1
The Programmed Wall
The Oblique Hole




Robotic Metal Aggregations Workshop, RMIT University, Melbourne, 2013
Design and fabrication of spatial structures with discrete metal sections
Traditionally, in order to ease construction, space frame typologies have been based on the repetitive framing of generic bars. However, the shift from manual labour to digital fabrication challenges this dependency on repetition and regularity. By integrating digital fabrication technologies into the design and production process, novel forms of architectural materialisation can be explored.

A six day workshop conducted at RMIT addresses these novel production conditions by investigating the robotic assembly of nonstandard spatial structures aggregated out of discrete elements. The lightweight metal bars connect face to face to one another. Custom made software tools allowed the participants to incorporate the intricate fabrication constraints in order to design the complex structures. The robot’s six degrees of freedom are used to position and orient linear bars in space and joins them with a structural glue into three dimensional structures. As a consequence, external reference or support systems are unnecessary. Although composed out of generic elements and using simple joints, highly differentiated spatial arrangements can be realized.
Credits:
Gramazio Kohler Research, ETH Zurich

In cooperation with: Leanne Zilka and Roland Snooks
Collaborators: Jason Lim and Ammar Mirjan
Students: Jonathan Brener, Cian Davis, Mark Di Bartolo, Dominique Hall, Anja Jertz, Richard Maddock, Marc Micuta, James Pazzi, David Smith, Jamie Sol, Anastasiya Vitusevych
Consultancy: Andrew Thompson and John Cherry
Sponsors: Sika

Copyright 2016, Gramazio Kohler Research, ETH Zurich, Switzerland
Gramazio Kohler Research
Chair of Architecture and Digital Fabrication
ETH Zürich HIB E 43
Stefano-Franscini Platz 1 / CH-8093 Zurich

+41 44 633 49 06
+41 44 633 11 71